baseballsdeep:

Congratulations Johan, but…
… the third base umpire Adrian Johnson in tonight’s Cardinals-Mets game, in which Johan Santana was credited with the first no-hitter in Mets history, gets an assist. With no outs in the top of the 6th inning, Johnson incorrectly ruled this line drive off the bat of Carlos Beltran down the third base line foul.
In the words of John McEnroe, “You have got to be kidding me!… Chalk flew up! That ball was in!”

GIF from CBSsports.com article, “The no-hitter that wasn’t” by Dayn Perry.
How does an umpire miss this? A ball mark ON the foul line is clearly visible. The error is forgivable but escalating into an argument with Cardinals third base coach Jose Oquendo and then manager Matt Matheny is not.
Still a tremendous effort by Johan Santana. There is a little bit of luck involved in every no-hitter. Case in point - this great catch by left fielder Brian Baxter to preserve the no-no.
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baseballsdeep:

Congratulations Johan, but…

… the third base umpire Adrian Johnson in tonight’s Cardinals-Mets game, in which Johan Santana was credited with the first no-hitter in Mets history, gets an assist. With no outs in the top of the 6th inning, Johnson incorrectly ruled this line drive off the bat of Carlos Beltran down the third base line foul.

In the words of John McEnroe, “You have got to be kidding me!… Chalk flew up! That ball was in!”

GIF from CBSsports.com article, “The no-hitter that wasn’t” by Dayn Perry.

How does an umpire miss this? A ball mark ON the foul line is clearly visible. The error is forgivable but escalating into an argument with Cardinals third base coach Jose Oquendo and then manager Matt Matheny is not.

Still a tremendous effort by Johan Santana. There is a little bit of luck involved in every no-hitter. Case in point - this great catch by left fielder Brian Baxter to preserve the no-no.

“[I]n 1931, the American League made a series of rules changes which impacted the definition of “home run” so greatly as to render the above to penny-ante status. After this rule change, a ball which went over the fence in fair territory but landed foul would, as it is today, be considered a homer. Prior to that, such a swat was considered a foul ball — a long strike, debited from the batter’s allotment of three. Some researchers believe that the Babe lost as many as 75 (!) home runs due to this rule.”