iOS vs. Microsoft: Comparing the bottom lines | asymco:

This… chart shows that iOS products combined are more profitable than Microsoft as a whole.
Microsoft invented the software business and built it to become the world’s most valuable business by the year 2000. It’s still been growing since and after 35 years it is reaching a profit of $27 billion per year. It did this while maintaining enormous margins and a highly disruptive monopoly business model the likes of which the world had never seen before.
It is scarcely believable then that a device business has been created to overtake it in four years.

iOS vs. Microsoft: Comparing the bottom lines | asymco:

This… chart shows that iOS products combined are more profitable than Microsoft as a whole.

Microsoft invented the software business and built it to become the world’s most valuable business by the year 2000. It’s still been growing since and after 35 years it is reaching a profit of $27 billion per year. It did this while maintaining enormous margins and a highly disruptive monopoly business model the likes of which the world had never seen before.

It is scarcely believable then that a device business has been created to overtake it in four years.

“Yet the phone number remains stubbornly fixed with a single carrier and single device, even as consumers begin to move every other aspect of their lives to the cloud. And the more I think about it, the more ridiculous it seems: Why can’t I open a desktop app and use my wireless minutes to make VoIP calls? Why can’t I check and respond to my text messages online? Why can’t I pick up any phone from any carrier, enter my phone service information, and be on my way, just as with email or IM or Skype? Why are we still pretending that phone service is at all different from any other type of data? The answer to almost all of these questions is carrier lock-in — your phone number is a set of handcuffs that prevents you from easily jumping ship, and they know it.”

iMessage, Skype, Google Voice, and the death of the phone number

Best thing I’ve read in months. Read that headline again: the death of the phone number.

John Gruber:

Nice catch from MacDailyNews: as of the close of market today, Apple is worth more than Microsoft and Intel combined. And some tasty claim chowder on this Bill Gates quote from June 1998, regarding Steve Jobs’s return to Apple as CEO:

“What I can’t figure out is why he [Steve Jobs] is even trying? He knows he can’t win.”

According to Wolfram Alpha, using their mean market caps for the entire month of June 1998 (it was a volatile month amidst the boom), the Wintel combination was worth $339 billion, vs. $3.5 billion for Apple. Put another way, Microsoft and Intel combined were worth 96 times more than Apple then. Since then, you get this.

John Gruber:

Nice catch from MacDailyNews: as of the close of market today, Apple is worth more than Microsoft and Intel combined. And some tasty claim chowder on this Bill Gates quote from June 1998, regarding Steve Jobs’s return to Apple as CEO:

“What I can’t figure out is why he [Steve Jobs] is even trying? He knows he can’t win.”

According to Wolfram Alpha, using their mean market caps for the entire month of June 1998 (it was a volatile month amidst the boom), the Wintel combination was worth $339 billion, vs. $3.5 billion for Apple. Put another way, Microsoft and Intel combined were worth 96 times more than Apple then. Since then, you get this.

“Over the weekend, Microsoft released the beta of TouchStudio, a free Windows Phone app that allows one to write programs for a phone on the very same phone, no computer required. According to the Microsoft Research project page, the work-in-progress TouchStudio aims to bring ‘the excitement of the first programmable personal computers to the phone.’ Among the code examples provided is a four-liner that scans a phone’s music collection for songs less than three minutes long and produces a fairly slick, clickable playlist complete with track info and artwork. Easier than iPhone SDK programming, no?”

I was extremely impressed by what the Microsoft Live Labs/Seadragon/Photosynth team had cooked up in cooperation with the Bing Maps team that Blaise Aguera y Arcas demoed at TED2010 (live video feed over 4G overlayed onto indoor Bing Maps “street view” in realtime + integration of worldwide telescope/”astronomically complete representation of the sky”). 

It’s great to see that they haven’t slowed down. The video above, via /., is a demo of Street Slide with some details on how it works and why it’s a massive improvement over Google’s Street View. I also found it interesting that this Microsoft demo mentions porting Street Slide to only one mobile device, the iPhone. The manager of the Windows Phone 7 division can’t be pleased (or surprised).